by Michelle Lapointe, KAB Member

Dragon boating is an exhilarating sport. As with all water-related activities, safety is paramount when our team, Knot A Breast Breast Cancer Survivor Dragon Boat Team, is out on the water. The water, wind and weather conditions can be wild or unpredictable. As paddlers, we must have the knowledge and skills to react efficiently to ensure the safety of ourselves and everyone in the boat.

The Knot A Breast annual safety “dunk” is a dragon boat capsize drill that all of our members must successfully complete before being allowed on the water each season. It is a simulation of the boat capsizing. One of our members, Donna Reise, oversees the safety dunk at a few of our winter pool practices so that every team member has the opportunity to practice this important drill. She goes over the importance of knowing this drill and the elements that keep each of us safe in the event of a capsize.

The “dunk” consists of Knot A Breast team members sitting on the side of the pool dressed in full paddling gear, dropping their paddles away from themselves, falling into the water, swimming across the pool with their buddy, then ducking under the water as if they were ducking out from under the dragon boat. Key safety messages include:

  • Stay calm and quiet
  • Find and stay with your buddy (seat partner)
  • Stay with the dragon boat

No one likes to go swimming fully dressed in their paddling clothes, but each of us understands the importance of practicing what to do should we find ourselves in the water.

Some of our Knot A Breast Breast Cancer Survivor Dragon Boat Team Members are familiar with Brian Kelly of SMBS Personal Training and Wellness Studio as a personal trainer or from taking his fitness classes. All of us are familiar with the effect of exercise on mental health. Brian has brought these together in his second annual Threshold Challenge.

Threshold to a Brighter Tomorrow raises money for the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) to provide rehabilitation care. The Threshold Challenge began in 2019 (see Knot A Blog: KAB joins the Metabolic Challenge for “Threshold to a Brighter Tomorrow”), and this year strives for even greater success. The challenge encourages people to get involved by completing daily and weekly physical and mental challenges for the month of February. Every challenge completed as well as every $10 donation to Threshold to a Brighter Tomorrow is rewarded with an entry for a prize. The set of daily challenges and the weekly challenges are provided below, along with the ways to win.

If you are hanging out with a Knot A Breast Breast Cancer Survivor Dragon Boat Team member during the winter months, you might hear them say, “I’m in the tank Saturday morning.” What vision does this bring to your mind? Maybe one of these definitions?

Tank NOUN

  1. a large receptacle or storage chamber, especially for liquid or gas. 
  2. a heavy armored fighting vehicle carrying guns and moving on a continuous articulated metal track. 
  3. NORTH AMERICAN informal: a cell in a police station or jail.

Number 1 would be close to what they are describing, but it is not a gas tank like in your car. On Saturday mornings in the winter, KAB members head to the Welland International Flatwater Centre (WIFC) to work out with their fellow paddlers, SNCC Welland Warlocks in the ‘tank.’ The WIFC is a state-of-the-art indoor facility for rowing, canoe, kayak and dragon boat training. The facility was built for the Pan Am Games and is the only one of its kind in North America.

In the summer season we train on open water and work hard to make the boat move through the water. In the tank, the boats are fixed in place and the water moves. Think of a treadmill, but with water as the moving surface instead of rubber. Different configurations of “seats” can be lowered into the tank that simulate rowing shells, canoes, kayaks and dragon boats. It differs from a swimming pool in that the water is less than a meter deep, and large pumps hidden at the end of the tank push the water from one end to the other creating a current. Coaches can move around the tank and even step into the boats to assist with technique, make corrections, and generally do what they do, coach. Mirrors are mounted along the sides of the tank so the athletes can view their reflections to review their form and work on perfecting their technique.

Knot A Breast Dragon Boat Team are very fortunate to be able to train at WIFC. Next time you hear a KAB member say, ‘I’m in the tank’, know that they are in winter training to perfect their technique and are dreaming of the upcoming competitive season.

Thank you to all the volunteers that helped to make our fundraiser a success!

The Knot A Breast Dragon Boat Team is partnering with the OHL Hamilton Bulldogs for our annual hockey fund-raiser on Friday, February 7, 2020; game starts at 7 PM. The Bulldogs play against the Ottawa 67s at The Dog Pound (nickname for FirstOntario Centre).

And it’s Country Night at The Dog Pound featuring a live acoustic intermission performance, a Bulldogs plaid trucker hat giveaway while supplies last, $4 Beers from 6 pm to 7 pm, Cowboy hats, and country-themed activities throughout the evening.

There are three ways to support Knot A Breast Breast Cancer Survivor Dragon Boat Team (KAB):

  1. Buy a ticket and enjoy the game! 
  2. Buy a ticket and donate it back so we can send Hamilton families to the game. 
  3. Go to the game and buy a bag of numbered pucks to play the “Chuck A Puck” game during the intermission. If your puck is closest to centre ice, you will win some great prizes!

Tickets for the game are $20 and available from any KAB members, or request tickets by contacting us (https://knotabreast.com/contact/). Chuck A Puck will be sold by KAB members at the game for $10 a bag.

Who let the dogs out! See you there!!

By Carrie Brooks-Joiner, KAB member

A handful of Knot A Breast team members attended the 10th Biennial Life After Breast Cancer Conference offered by the Juravinski Cancer Centre, October 25, 2019 at the Hamilton Convention Centre. We staffed a table in the trade show, proudly displayed a selection of trophies and medals, and tried to encourage as many women as possible to join the Knot A Breast Breast Cancer Survivor Dragon Boat Team. Nineteen conference attendees signed up for more information about our team!

This year’s keynote speaker was Dr. Alexandra Ginty, a Community Family Physician and the Regional Primary Care Lead for Cancer Care in Mississauga/Halton. Dr. Ginty shared her story of how she coped with her own breast cancer diagnosis and transitioned from the doctor to patient role. She is a strong advocate for art therapy, journaling and a cognitive behavior therapy approach to improve mental health. Alex shared what she called “Positive Thinking Cards”. Each has a different theme such as “Resilience”, “No Excuses”, and were a simple list of reminders to herself. Card #1, “Things to Remember” included “Enjoy every moment. Ask for help. Take naps. Don’t feel guilty.”, etc. in her long and personal list. I recall such reminders as resonating in the days when the word ‘cancer’ was a 24/7 thought and getting through the day was daunting. Dr. Ginty’s message was well received by many in attendance who were looking for such guidance.

As Knot A Breast Dragon Boat Team winds down our on-water paddling season for 2019, we reflect on this outstanding year by recognizing the amazing support of our home base, Macassa Bay Yacht Club (MBYC). They do so much for us: provide a club house, boat dockage and storage, washrooms and showers, a pleasant garden to do our warm-ups and stretches in, social memberships with its perks, etc. And that is only the physical support. As Breast Cancer Survivors, their emotional support means even more to us.

As a small thank-you, we host their Saturday BBQ twice a summer. This year it was August 17 and September 21, 2019 when our members, family and friends took on food preparation, cooking and sales for KAB paddlers, MBYC boaters and their supporters to purchase. Sausages and hamburgers (and one veggie burger) with all the fixings were simply delicious. KAB member, Aleta Thompson, donated her heavenly, homemade butter tarts to sell. Funds raised through food sales and a 50/50 draw are used by MBYC to support worthwhile causes in our community such as YMCA Hamilton-Burlington Strong Kids Campaign.

Thank-you Macassa Bay Yacht Club: you are more than a friend – you are family!

BBQ-Aug-2019-1
BBQ-2019-Ann_Hewitson_Alex_Brooks-Joiner
BBQ-2019-Lynn_Youngman
BBQ-Aug-2019-3
BBQ-2019-KAB
BBQ-2019-Christine_Carey
BBQ-Aug-2019-4
previous arrow
next arrow
BBQ-Aug-2019-1
BBQ-2019-Ann_Hewitson_Alex_Brooks-Joiner
BBQ-2019-Lynn_Youngman
BBQ-Aug-2019-3
BBQ-2019-KAB
BBQ-2019-Christine_Carey
BBQ-Aug-2019-4
previous arrow
next arrow

By Carrie Brooks-Joiner, KAB member

Many sports work specific muscle groups to a greater extent than others. As dragon boaters, Knot A Breast Breast Cancer Survivors focus on strengthening the shoulders, core and lats, and improving our overall cardio-fitness. While we have heard one of our coaches say that “dragon boaters don’t need strong legs,” our health and fitness can benefit from adding other sports or types of activities.

Among the benefits of cross-training include:

  • Improved total fitness. By adding in other activities that bring in more cardio-fitness, stretching and/or strength training, we can improve our overall fitness.
  • Reduced risk of injury. Spread the load, and increase flexibility and strength.
  • Weight loss. More activity burns calories. Need I say more?
  • Sticking with fitness. Switching it up reduces boredom and provides new opportunities to try new things and train with others.

by Christine Carey, KAB member

A team isn’t built in a day. It takes years of learning a stroke technique (and then re-learning a new stroke), adaptability within the dragon boat and desire to succeed. Building on the expert coaching from Kathy Levy, Knot A Breast Breast Cancer Survivor Dragon Boat Team has exemplified the definition of teamwork and demonstrated that great things can come from a difficult journey. The fundamental meaning of TEAM, Together Everyone Achieves More, remains a guiding principle for Knot A Breast in the dragon boat and as a cancer support group on land.

Recognizing that similar teamwork values remain the foundation and strength of effective companies, Knot A Breast provided a Team Building Opportunity for Stryker employees on July 26, 2019 at the Macassa Bay Yacht Club. Learning the intricate details of the stroke and role of each section in the boat, about 15 Stryker employees learned the importance of working together to achieve the goal of moving a one ton dragon boat (and of course, not tipping the boat). It was an hour of fun, under the hot sun, where Stryker was able to experience the success of working as a TEAM.

by Carolyn Lucier, KAB member

Saturday, July 6, 2019

Dear Diary,

Hey, it’s me (again). Today was a BIG day! I participated in my first dragon boat race with the Knot A Breast (KAB) Breast Cancer Survivor Team at the Hamilton Waterfest Dragon Boat Festival.

I am what KAB calls a “newbie”. As new members of this high-caliber team, we spend our first year learning the dragon boat paddling technique, and how the team works together to move the boat, and we get to race in one “newbie race”. For me, that was Waterfest.

That’s me, on the left with the other 2019 “newbies” and Coach Kathy, 4th from the left.

Knot A Breast Dragon Boat Team is literally moving forward with celebrating 20 years of paddling in Hamilton. Look for our team photo on HSR buses, the Hamilton Waterfront Trust Trolley, and at Macassa Bay Yacht Club!

Advertisement showing team paddling during race
Knot A Breast Breast Cancer Survivor Dragon Boat Team ad

The photo was taken by Don Wood, one of our fans and husband to teammate Kim Short, during one of our races. Jessica Combate, Graphic Designer specializing in healthcare and corporate communications (contact at 289-489-7048, jessica.combate@gmail.com), designed the advertisement. Knot A Breast would like to thank both of them for capturing the spirit of our team: Together Everyone Achieves More.

We hope the advertisement builds community awareness of our 20 years of showing women and men that they can lead full and active lives after treatment for breast cancer.