I had never seen a mastectomy scar until I viewed my own. As much as I admired the artistry of the elaborate tattoos, I didn’t have a need or desire to hide my mastectomy scar. With a length of 7 inches, it would take a large tattoo to hide it. I wasn’t interested in anything that substantial or that would show when I am dressed. 

With thoughts of hiding the scar out the window, I increasingly became intrigued by the idea of “owning” my scar and how a tattoo might enhance that concept. The scar is a long, thin imperfect line that starts at my sternum and ends under my armpit. I played with the idea of the line as a wire and imagined small birds on it (Leonard Cohen in my ears) or turning it into telephone wires with poles. A string? Not vertical enough for a kite. A tail? No rodents or creatures on this chest. Eventually, I got back to the idea of the scar as a former wound. I like sewing and imagined a needle and thread with large stitches across the scar just like the mending of a tear in clothing. Too cliché. A zipper? No, that was a scar cover and I’d decided against hiding it. I thought I had it with the idea of tattooed staples but in the end, decided that it was too Frankenstein. I was getting nowhere, and the months were passing by. After much research and reference checking, I had selected a tattoo artist, but I still didn’t know what I wanted in a tattoo.